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to keep the government funded through september avoiding a shutdown but keeping in place the sequester. explain to us how the government funding will work thund bill. guest: they are able to continue funding government past the march 37 deadline. it was a very fine line they had to walk. republicans weren't going to sign off on something that redid the cr but there are a number of republicans who were trying to get piece of the sequester reinstated. so as a result they put together a package, a compromise mostly came together in the senate, both side working together that restores some of the funding but fleeves place a lot of the other cuts. air traffic control towers still going to see problems. other places fur lowses will still happen. meat inspec tors spared the action a little bit. we are all making a bill big deal about the budget this week because in regular order there is a budget, there are appropriation bills and this is how government functions. in the last few years they haven't done that. without it government would have shut down. host: we are talking with ginger gibson.
. they threw out the european union plan that included a levy on bank accounts. government leaders need to raise $5.8 billion euros to qualify for a bailout worth $10 billion. they accepted an eu plan that involved taking money from people's bank accounts. lawmakers flew that plan out. the government leaders want to raise the collateral by reorganizing major banks and creating a fund without using people's savings. they want to have the lie and's biggest bank absorb the rest. members of the staff union are protesting in front of the parliament building. they say breaking up the bank would destroy 2,000 jobs. even if lawmakers approve the new plan, eu officials may reject it. leaders in germany had doubts about the way leaders intend to raise the money. analysts say the negotiations will be tough. cyprus' finance minister tried to get help from russia but he's on his way home empty handed. he spent two days talking with his russian counterpart bloomberg quotes him as saying he hadn't been able to get the support he wanted and he said he still has a chance to get the russians to ease the
to no state. attacking states, laying low state governments, depleting the taliban, defeating al qaeda -- iraq. it will not stop it because terrorism, like sustainability, like markets, are interdependent in their character. so what we have created in the beginning of the 21st century is a deep asymmetry between the challenges we face and the political response the political institutions we have to respond to that. every challenge is interdependent, global cross frontier, and the primary political actors that respond are bounded, frontiered, independent nation states. and in that asymmetry, you can see the dysfunction of the modern world. we watch, for example, starting four or five years in copen hagueen and going through mexico city and dubai and nations came together to renew the kyoto protocol already out of term of the date. at least to embrace that antiquated document and failing to do so. and going home and saying that is because our sovereignty says china said the u.s., says now canada, even leaders on keogh know doesn't permit us to monitor, to report to international body, doesn't pe
the federal government can hire millions of people to make this legislation possible. it's idiotic. they should break it around started all over. >> eric: and remember when president clinton said that it would not add to the debt and now it's trillion dollars? >> it's amazing people hate so much of it. let's note the american people when asked about the specific provisions in the affordable care act actually like it. they like tax credits for small insurance and closing the medicare loopholes and 80% of like those things and less than 50% know they are in the bill. >> let's talk about why this is going to kick in. eric they purposely wrote this thing, once it is in all the crappy things come out. knows what is going to happen to medicare costs and medicare or anything like that. good luck trying to find a doctor or nurse. they did this in purpose. they bam, smacked you with this. >> eric: that 80% of the people are okay with this? >> are they going to be okay when their premiums okay when they rise 100%. honestly this is birthday party, take this birthday present and bring it back
. the government has blamed opposition fighters for the attack. we go live now to beirut. tell us about the funeral and how it went. very prominenta figure. oft to show how prominent, the most 500 influential muslims in the world, he is ranked 23rd. he is very highly regarded and considered an independent figure. that is why in his funeral, which you are looking at pictures of right now, most of those people who are speaking are very much giving him a lot of praise that you do not see for many other clerics. what makes it significant is that he is a sunni cleric of kurdish origin, and he still supports president assad, and he was a very big supporter of his presidents before him. their strong opponent to the muslim brotherhood in syria for many years. his assassination has been condemned not only by those who support the government but also those in the opposition politically. they praised him. they said he was an independent figure. they gave him credit, but they said they disagreed with him politically, but it does not make his chilling something they can bank. of course, it is a very controversi
the government fears contagion. it starts doing naughty things. this is limiting how much those folks can take out once they can get out the money. it is enacting sweeping measures that are raising eyebrows worldwide. banks rethinking even being there. paying customers wanting to get out of there. it is a mess. in these next 72 hours, cyprus officials are very lelia. they are working overtime to contain this mess. let me put it this way. cyprus is no longer an island. cyprus is a tsunami. it scares me customers worldwide. that is what they are hoping to avoid this weekend. it depends on whether they deal with this. going to john brown, and our own nicole petallides on whether they can and will. nicole kno of what she speaks. her parents are from cyprus and she has visited there many times or so. these are wholly times. >> i am so glad that you're painting it in the proper way. this is .2% of europe's gdp. it is a small island and it is being menial to so many. but it paints a picture of what is going on there. which is catastrophic. you go in there and you are talking about confiscating peles
the government is looking out for them people, they have health care coverage for it insurance companies know when they go to the system, they are out of business. i will be glad when we go to a so allpayer system americans will be covered without having to spend their entire welfare covering medical bills. i can't believe americans are so stupid. host: eleanor on our line for dependents. -- independents. caller: it seems like the republicans want to stand up for big business. at least now when the affordable care act, the insurance companies have to pay a larger portion towards patient care, i think that is the report that problem republican have with it. , our line for democrats. are you there? caller: yes. i don't think that what they are doing to obama after they put , inin the chair that we florida, as older people, as you call it, done it worked and paid into it, we need the health thing. i have been on its in putting sinced i have seen -- 1988. i have seen it three or four times change. why do they put any president in and they keep changing it? now, they put obama in their -- there. ,
, basically what they tell us is it's a nicer wrapper around the same product. you still have government supervisors, identical technology, identical procedures, they don't seem to think it's going to save us that much money. so, just a question of whose pocket the paycheck is coming out of. >> it's not only saving, it's improving efficiency. privatization bet center >> hand it to the airlines. if american airlines doesn't protect its passengers it goes out of business. if the tsa doesn't protect the passengers it gets more funding. we have an incentive problem. in the private sector you are forced to do better. in the government you are rewarded. >> bill, do incentives matter here as they do most places? >> maybe but i say no, don't give privatization a bad name by assigning it an activity which is an expensive mess no matter who undertakes it. i would rather have john and steve use their powers of persuasion and libertarian instincts to apply to another need. privatize elementary schools. >> a subject for another conversation. we'll have that conversation. mike, by the way to clarify t
to northbound this is a nightmare. this is so the federal government can hire millions of people to make this legislation possible. it's idiotic. they should break it and start all over. >> 2200 pages turned into 20,000 so far. i remember when president clinton saiddy not have sex with that woman. president obama setd this will not add a single dime to the deficit. >> look, it's going to bring down health care costs. it's amazing people hate so much something that has barely taken effect. most hasn't gone into effect. the american people when asked about the specific provisions in the affordable care act like it. they like tax credits for small businesses to pay for insurance, they like closing the medicare donut hole, they like kids staying on insurance. 80% of people like those and less than 50% know they are in the bill. so stop smearing the bill to tell people what's really in it. >> talk about why this didn't kick in. we had to wait until it got voted back in. they wrote this so that once he's in all the crabby stuff comes out. stuff we're two years in nobody has a clue what a state
that the government had any role in the financial crisis, it was in failing to regulate adequately either those institutions or the mortgage originators who profited by selling mortgages to people who couldn't afford them. the book traces the influence of this narrative into the specific provisions of the dodd-frank act. i argue in the book that this narrative is false. it was bad history, and it produced worse policy. it is certainly true that the private sector had some role in the financial crisis, but this was relatively minor when compared to the government's effort throughout the clinton and in part of the bush administrations to degrade mortgage standards in order to increase home ownership. this contrary view was never put before the american people in time for its implications to be considered in the debate over dodd-frank. if that debate had occurred, it's unlikely that the dodd-frank act would have been enacted in anything like its current form. now, why did this debate not occur? why was there no competition in ideas on this matter? that is what i'll largely talk about today. for th
the high cost of government. >> i don't understand all the commotion about jones, espeally if they are used by law enforcement. you mentioned that people think you are crazy if you are for jones. but what about the privacy base? think about it. police five helicopters over your house now. they have cameras. do you have a problem with that? they are useful and valuable as a law enforcement tool they can help look for lost people and bad guys and their quick on their response. the fuel and maintenance costs is low than the cost of a helicopter. as a pilot, i want them flown on the under the watchful eye of the faa. but let's help law enforcement do a better job of keeping our neighborhoods safe. melissa: thank you, tom. be sure to catch it at seven and 10:00 p.m. on saturday and sunday, the tom sullivan show. i will be a guest this weekend. happy friday and thank you for joining us. have a great cruise. [lghter] anythingo help. good night. >> more than 1,000 students have gathered to steady liberty should even be in college? if they work as interns are they exploited? if they are illegal sho
made an announcement here, but these are sources being quoted within the government, within meetings taking place at the presidential palace, suggesting that they have reached agreement on that very controversial question about a deposit, a compulse or pi eposit tax and what -- compulsory deposit tax. they are proposing 20% of accounts over $130,000 in the bank of cyprus and 4% on the other banks in the sector, bank, the ean lyki second biggest. in theory, these two deposit haircuts won't require another vote, so this makes up another total package, including the plan to save the banks, wind them up and save the cost of recapitalizing, that the cypriots can take on sunday to the euro group and finance mirnses and the i.m.f., based on closed-door meetings that have been going on all day with the troika and say here's our compromise, give us the bail out so we can get opened. it looks like cyprus now is tantalizingly close to a deal. but it it won't come without significant pain for many. peter sharp has this report. >> the people of cyprus had endured a week of increasing uncertainty.
it requires closer coordination between the government and the central bank as well as a boj chief willing to undertake bold monetary easing. by all accounts, kuroda is his man. >> translator: the japanese economy has been struggling with deflation for nearly 15 years. the greatest mission of the central bank is to end deflation and achieve the inflation target of 2% as soon as possible. >> cue row do da has said he believes the boj can achieve the target within two years and says he'll use every tool at his disposal to make that happen. >> translator: the bank of japan must use all possible means to achieve the 2% inflation target. by expanding monetary easing both in terms of volume and quantity, the 2% inflation target can be achieved. >> joining kuroda are two more deputy governors, kikuo iwata, a former professor and former executive director hiroshi nakaso. iwata is a long time proponent of using a so-called reflation policy to stamp out deflation, like kuroda, he maintains that pumping money into the markets would lift consumer prices. >> translator: my research is focused on studyi
in denial, of the facts. -- in denial of the facts. there are an awful lot of people that despise government precisely because it opened the door for common citizenship, for people of all races and nature is in the united states, so it is still controversial, but it is beyond that, tavis. our country measures schools, by the way they teach math and the way they teach reading. not history. history is the key to citizenship, and because we do not teach this, we are in danger of having people coming of age that do not understand this, he and the civil-rights era -- this, and the civil-rights era is one to show how people use their citizenship to change the nation for the better. we lose a lot by not transmitting it, and we cannot blame the kids. they do not get this history through the umbilical cord. a lot of people were embarrassed by being racist, other is embarrassed by -- there are barriers to psychological readiness, but what we have to understand is that through those barriers is where we really make our greatest progress, and that is what the 1960's were really about, and that is, to me
for st. paul dropping the supreme court case. the federal government said we would not join two false claims access cases that would be brought again. >> paul: by private citizens and the department of housing and urban development had wanted the justice department to intervene on behalf of the claimants and perez got them to back off that in turn for st. paul dropping the case. now, what is the theory of racial discrimination is called disparty impact could be-- they worship at the altar of parity and 13% of freshman and 13% of the class and firemen that basis alone.mination can >> you don't have to prove it in an individual case. >> right, if the policy in place, however race neutral it is, if it's producing disparate outcomes then it's the policy. >> paul: and perez was housing housing law to prosecute banks with this theory. >> that's right. >> paul: and he thought this might be illegal, why? because the disparate is used in some parts, but not in housing. >> it's employment. but they don't have the same language as title vii law and he was afraid at that st. paul would win this c
. meanwhile, at the finance ministry, the government has been holding talks with the imf, european central bank, and the european commission. progress on details of the bailout is slow. the majority of the issues on that paper to not call for any further work. there were two issues which will allow me not to go into any detail calling for greater quantification. >> the european commission books prepared to compromise. the biggest banks face a hair cut of 20% on deposits rather than 25%, a breakthrough that may be key to securing parliament's approval. >> we are following the story in cyprus and we are joined on the line. nathan, fill us in on the details of the possible deal. >> as we just heard, we understand there has been agreement between cyprus and the e.u. and imf at a 20% levy will be slapped on deposits of over 100,000 euros at the bank of cyprus, the biggest blunder in this country. 4% levy on deposits, the same amount as other lenders, which would include the much talked- about lackey bank. these pension funds, which we have heard so much about, which we also know were opposed by
. >> the sequestration has arrived. >> $85 billion in automatic government spending cuts. >> jon: dammit! [laughter] the first penalty of the sequester, my federal pen program. fake thing. [ laughter ] the sequester is here. the arbitrary budget cuts that were so onus congress would never allow the sequester to take effect. remember? >> it was ugly. it was designed to be ugly. >> onerous and undesirable and it remains our view it's no way to go. >> no way it can happen. >> automatic triggers are set up to be so painful we don't have to get to that point. >> it will not happen. >> jon: of course it will n .t. democrats and republicans would have to be not to goat to this ball punch it's like dennis rodman in north korea. [ laughter ] [cheers and applause] yeah, or the hottest show in the country being about duck call manufacturing. by the way, even though coming up with the most basic of spending cut and tax revenue frameworks was beyond the skill level of this congress there was another way to completely avoid the arbitrary cuts. >> we will be amongst the first on the floor to nullify that provisio
. can the government come up with a bankruptcy plan for the banks? we will go live to nicosia. >> u.s. president barack obama wraps up his three-day tour of the middle east with a final stop in jordan and a bit of telephone peace brokering. and "cloud atlas" is the front runner in this year's nominations for the german film prize, the lolas. for cyprus, the coming weekend is make or break time. lawmakers have two more days to come up with a bailout plan for the banks or risk sending the whole country into economic collapse. >> the european central bank has said cyprus must come up with 5.8 billion euros by monday in order to qualify for a 10 billion euro bailout. if nicosia fails, the ecb will cut off funding to the ivan. russia further increase pressure on friday, saying it will not offer financial aid until a final plan that the eu is sealed. >> that has the government in nicosia backed or it was a few days ago. that includes a controversial tax on bank accounts to fund the bailout. >> people in cyprus brave the storm to protest outside parliament ahead of a crucial few hours for
improved the federal government possibility to respond to disasters but it also has increased the capability for state and local governments to rebuild. we also require fumet to coordinate with other federal the markets to write a national recovery strategy. -- with other federal departments to write a national recovery strategy. -- we have notry seen the sort of problems that we did after hurricane katrina. this committee now has a subcommittee with responsibilities before fema. notable to great work. -- no doubt they will do great work. the question we need to ask is if it was an aberration or an omen of things to come. --f of our east coast hurricane sandy is the third major hurricane to threaten or strike our east coast in the last three years. hurricane irene devastated parts of the coast in 2011. unfortunately the northeast and other vulnerable areas are expected to see more frequent and larger storms in the future. this would suggest that last -- thehe government impact of climate change on the federal government. it was explained among other things that climate change
the proposals before the end of the week -- i'm sorry, before they left town. they want to keep the government running through september 30. the leadership had anticipated this because there was a dispute. so here we are friday night and the budget is not done. >> how much support is the budget is allusion expected to get? resolution -- it only needs 51 votes. as of this morning, there were four power up or be election in 2014 in that mr. romney one in 2014. -- wion in 2014. they have not yet said whether or not they would vote for that budget. it might be a nailbiter. >> the house passed its budget blueprint. what is the next that in both chambers? >> each chamber will pass a budget. harry reid was added as conference. there'll be effort to try to reach a budget resolution. said something like, what is a point of trying? we are so far apart. the two proposals are vastly different. , in theif anything absence of a presidential budget on capitol hill that the senate democrats and house republicans will use this opportunity to lay out their long-term vision for what the budget should look la ike
. the egyptian government has been trying to get the imf to give them the loan on easier budgetary terms than what was originally agreed. shouldt think the u.s. strong arm the imf to do that. i think the egyptian government should make the right terms. the imf -- this is not a tough, austerity program they are trying to enforce on the egyptian government. the u.s. needs to play this the right way. we do not want a crisis in egypt. we want to encourage sound decisions economically and the building of a political consensus. in order to make sound decisions morsi will need to take to get the imf money, he will have to have a broader political consensus. last word -- assuming we get through this crisis and there is an imf agreement and some of movement toward elementary elections in which there is broad participation, the u.s. should take that opportunity to help egypt much more economically. by becoming an aggregator of international assistance and investment and so forth for egypt. the u.s. could easily play this kind of leadership role. that would also give us more leverage over egypt and enco
be exaggerating slightly. but in all seriousness that the challenges of the government, which will are always going to exist. they seem to be more difficult than they were a decade ago. i am wondering if you can talk about what changed and what can reverse those trends. >> had is my story and i'm sticking to it, that things were perfect. partly, we were dealt with a series of crisis and we had an impeachment crisis, we had the 9/11 attack, we an anthrax attack in my office. when you have crisis like that it brings people together. partly it was the environment and the sicks that we had to confront -- circumstances that we had to cold front. as nk what has changed is she said we would work longer weeks and people were there for longer periods of time. the venues for communication were at hand. she will remember this well. we used to have two lunch tables that were just for senators and you sit family style. people would have lunch together. for whatever reason that lunchroom was closed. we used to have social events where we getting together and one was around our spouses and we would salute
signature. these are democrats. this is their idea of government. everybody in the country needs to be paying attention to what the democrats and in some cases a handful of republins are doing. at a time when we should be talking about transparency on the issues of our time. we are simply being brushed aside by imperious and elitist government. just a few days later, lawmakers admitted they were adopting law enforcement officers. imagine not. a month later, they said they wanted to use banned assault weapons. earlier this week, governor cuomo admitted that he had to amend the law. because it bans the sale of this. they didn't even think about that. the idiocy of the whole process is astounding. new report out today saying that governor cuomo is trying to lure the "tonight show" back to manhattan. that is riht, nbc with thre shows is trying to, well, basically dump the host of one of their three winning shows. these are brilliant people. right and to get the show back to manhattan providing 30 percent tax break if it decides t leave to caper but it is no secret that cuomo likes ho
relationship with the turkish government. it's a completely different world. it's completely opposite. when their armed forces show up, it's not really lacked upon as a good thin. this is why i want to say thank you to our military that's here today, to the army, the navy, the military in general, the marines, the coast guard, even i saw a couple air force running around here yesterday. the fact that you are here and you are in san francisco and you do this every year, it says a lot. because we lack at -- look at this as a good week. we have a great working relationship and after being there and seeing that it's not a good relationship and people get really, really tense when the guys in green show up, it makes me appreciate what we have all the more. there's one other thing i really appreciate, by the way, and i'll direct this to general speese being the trainer that he is, i got a whole new appreciation for muzzle discipline back there. i appreciate the fact that we drill that into our personnel that don't point anything you don't want to shoot at. because there's one point i was actu
earned tax dollars wisely. we should but only what we need to cover the functions of government and not a dollar more. that is why we support reforms to fix the programs washington should be funding and a limited programs it shouldn't and balance a budget. federali note that the government wastes hundreds of dollars each year. we need to identify and remove wasteful areas of the budget. instead the president has decided to cut on order security, first responders, and law enforcement. the director of u.s. immigration and customs recently testified before a house subcommittee that for budgetary reasons, more than 2 2200 illegl immigrants and 10 high-level offenders were released back onto our streets. at the same time, news outlets reported that the transportation security administration signed a new deal to purchase millions of dollars of new uniforms. how is it that we have money for new uniforms, but not enough to keep dangerous criminals behind bars? we could have prevented this kind of nonsense if washington had a budget. rather than having a budget battle between republicans
light cameras. i think a great many of us, myself included, have very deep concerns about the government collecting information on the citizenry and with the ease and availability of drones there is a real concern that the day to day conduct of american citizens going about their business might be monitored, catalogs and recorded by the federal government and i for one would have very deep concerns about that. i would ask the question of amie stepanovich. do you share those concerns? and if so, what reasonable limitations should be considered to protect the privacy rights of all americans? >> anytime you come up with a new surveillance technology you are going to have instances where the technology catches bad actors doing bad deeds but those few instances are at the expense of dragnet, constant surveillance of all citizens as they go through rather daily life, not consistent with constitutional protection than what the country was built on. we need to prevent drones' from becoming alternatives for police patrols flying up and down when not talking about aerial drones driving up and down
. but with right to work states adding more jobs and with many in the government looking to cut more spending, is it time tore unions to simply get with the program? charles payne, dagen mcdowell, adam lashinsky, charlie gas pregas-- gasperino. >> and with the. >> i love the big raps. >> and communities with fewer presence of unions are doing better communities and businesses. the they drove hostess out of business and they have to figure out the dynamics. they've got to take a step back, we're trying to benefit and not in it for ourselves and the message doesn't get across anymore. >> neil: dagen? >> this is evidence of unions on the run. if you look at michigan, a huge move that that state, kind of the birth of unions as we know it in this country, is now a right to work state, but what you see -- you're starting to see the down and dirty tactics. a lot of unions in that state tried to do or are doing like is run around the law, but putting in place like wayne state university, for example, mandatory dues must be paid by the unions for periods of years, eight years in just that case. you're
on the federal government to set them up. >> no money was budgeted for the federal government to do that. congress seems unwilling to give the administration money to do that. we're looking at a very messy situation. >> house republican speaker john boehner said in a statement today that three years into obamacare, health insurance premiums have, quote, spiked, and the price tag for the overall law has, quote, nearly doubled: rick? >> molly henneberg, thank you very much. >> the u.s. senate passing its first budget proposal in more than four years, voting in a marathon session ending just before dawn this morning. >> the ayes are 50. the nays are 49. >> the senate has passed a budget. >> the nonbinding proposal, along with a measure passed in the house is expected to serve as the basis for future negotiations with the white house. elizabeth prann has more from our dc news room. >> it may have taken all night, but the senate narrowly approvessed the budget for the first time in four years, passing 50-49. it's a $3.7 trillion blue print plan raising a trillion dollars in new taxes and the
, but it is what it is. at the heart of it is ending too big to fail, giving the government new tools to resolve large financial institutions when they feel in a way it will not hurt taxpayers and not subject them to risk. well, it forced losses on the shareholders and creditors of the large financial institutions, which is where they belong. it also requires the federal reserve board to have much tougher prudential standards, so higher capital, more stable liquidity, less reliance on short-term debt. those are the types of things that were problems during the crisis and the fed has been mandated to have better regulation to prevent banks from getting in trouble to begin with. the volcker rule, too, a key part, it was designed to prohibit proprietary trading by those institutions in the government safety net. if you're a bank holding company that has an insured bank that has fdic-backed deposits or access to the federal reserves discount window, you have a lot of government support provided to traditional banks. so volcker is really about customer service. your banking model should be serving cu
. >> lawmakers in the house and senate approved legislation to fund the government through the end of september. that avoids the risk of a partial federal shutdown. in the process, they are on spring break for a couple weeks. what's your take on this? >> my take is the whole financial dysfunction of our congress is mind blow iing. you look at this week. let's say frederick, maryland, where there's air traffic control that will be shut. a tower that was built by the stimulus money. so stimulus money went into this tower. the government saying it's a priority. and the the government because of its dysfunction saying we have to shut is down. that's a perfect representation, i think, of how washington is not doing its job. we can't even pass a budget. it can't even run the books. there's no strategy. when you look at some of the spending cuts, you see a lack of a strategy in american finances. >> complaining about this for months. when i say fedex, you probably think of the guys coming to deliver a package. fedex as a gauge of the global economy. fedex posted its third drop in earnings and raised r
before the supreme court says the federal government will not recognize in the many programs a same-sex marriage that is recognized by the state. in terms of estate tax and benefits, some 1,000 programs. if a couple is legally married in the eyes of its is state, it is not married in the eyes of the federal government. that is a new policy for the federal government. prop 8 only speaks to california and bans same-sex marriage in california. >> scott: vik, they are different, but intersect. we will learn about what the justices feel about doma on tuesday when they ask questions about prop 8. what are the legal even tantangs here? >> jane is correct. the supreme court could strike one down without affecting the other. their way is to do that. both at the procedural level and substantive lae substantive level, there are comm commonalities. how do we defend a statute, the president and attorney general and governor, decline to defend? in both of these, the elected executive officials declined. that is a common question. on marriage, at base, the cases ask a fundamental question of prote
and at the end start doing law enforcement when the government declared catastrophe and the president gave us the authority to do that. so we move the army inland, next the navy in the coastal communities and in san feir fernandes island and doing an airlift to the most affected area. sanfernandes island is a very small island, only a thousand people living there, but it was completely destroyed. that's what we found when we arriving there, debris everywhere, and as you can see that was the port and the square before, and that was after. so the change is, it's quite impressive. the same was a local pier and a school. that was a school. nothing. so we put in the navy, the navy put them in there two, three combat ships, type 23's and l ship and transport plus mtaa aircraft transport, aircraft and hell helicopters to try to help people in there. we used the ships to deliver food, clothes and all that stuff without any problem. also we helped in different matters that the navy can do that. for instance here was with divers and with submarine robot to find bodies. getting medical assistance,
the asylum system. so the government has made asylum of use a punishable crime -- asylum abuse. 80% of those affected are roma. these drastic measures are to ensure other citizens can travel freely. the eu has threatened to suspend the said-free travel. these are hard times for the roma. elvira is 34 and has three children. she married her husband when she was 14. she lived in germany before as a child until she was 7. now the family of five lives in two rooms with her in-laws -- 12 square meters to eat, sleep, and do homework. the entryway serves as a kitchen. >> they would love to have another room so each would have their own bed, but that is impossible. >> they could use the suspended 50 euros a month welfare benefit. neither elvira nor her husband has worked. occasional day jobs earn them up 15 euros. fights are common at school. >> two or three times a week, not just fistfights, but with knives, brass knuckles, even guns. >> they venture out, but they are cautious. with more than 20,000 roma, it is the biggest community of its kind in europe. unemployment is an estimated 90%. it is fer
. this has been done by two graphical market. >> how much are you talking about without involving government run spectrum? each tv station runs on six megahertz. it is possible for them to share three megahertz apiece. if you add up those six or those trees, it creates a lot to get to that 60 that folks want in chicago, manhattan, or l.a.. then you find that broadcasters would have to give up their -- >> would government run spectrum be part of this auction process? about a government ,un free, wireless run network there was no basis to that. folks were confusing and inflating the idea of unlicensed spectrum. i have been a proponent of loa unlicensed use of unused tv channels in certain markets. they are sort of scrap spectrum, if you will. it is ideal for low powered devices. i am a little skeptical of a nationwide 30 megahertz. that is a big chunk of spectrum. use,haracteristic of that you need large transmitters when you're speaking about the chunks of spectrum. you're talking about harmful transitions i can go a long distance. that means a lot of electricity behind it and the towers. --
the dimmer switch on habeus corpus. [laughter] now, the government's prosecutor said she could explain who was doing it but not in open session. ooo! oo! i think i know! can i solve the puzzle?! let's see ahuum. well, whoever's doing it, it's got the defense lawyers worried that someone "might be listening to private communications between them and their clients at the defense table. c'mon, i realize these military tribunals are a little unconventional-- in that they may not be covered under the geneva conventions-- but it's paranoid to imagine that the government is eavesdropping on you at the defense table. they're eavesdropping on your attorney-client meeting rooms. [laughter] hey, they say justice is blind, but they never said she's deaf. [laughter] [cheers and applause] okay, so the whole thing's being spied on and controlled by unseen forces. big deal. it's just like "survivor," except in this case, no one gets voted off the island. but folks, i can understand that for many this trial has lost its legitimacy. so i say we do the ethical thing and let the detainees go free. then hunt t
trillion in new taxes. the government would still be in a deficit after ten years. senator patty murray argues the plan creates jobs and economic growth but, of course, during the process, patience did run thin. >> madam president, madam president, madam president. >> senate will come to order. >> madam president, the senate is not in order. i flow's a lot of march madness going on. we would like to keep it calm on the floor so that senators can be heard. >> reporter: the white house recently passed -- excuse me, the house recently passed the ryan budget plan which includes a $4.6 trillion deficit reduction over the next decade. these budget plans are resolutions are not bills. this week, congress did pass a continuing resolution bill which actually funds the government for the next six months. we did hear from white house press secretary jay carney, responding to today's news in a statement and reading, in part, "like the president's plan, the senate budget cuts wasteful spending, makes tough choices to strengthen entitlements and eliminates special tax breaks and loopholes for the wea
and the government would still be in a deficit ten years from now. senator patty murray, however, argues it creates jobs and economic growth for the democrats, the vote is a big accomplishment. >> first of all, over the last two decades the average budget resolution considered 78 amendments. we've done 101. average, we've done 70, twice as many. to doing this has been a herculean feat. >> hundreds of amendments were filed, but 70 were voted on. senators approved a sales tax for online retail sales and voted to approve tkeystone pipeline and to big to fail for big banks. and these are mostly symbolic gestures and show where the senators stand on issues and of course, when you take a 13 hour 6 minute vote there does have to be a little bit of humor. >> it is good to say that as of this time, 5 a.m., there has not been a day without a budget being passed in the united states senate. (laughter) . >> reporter: all democrats voted yea with exception four who are up for reelection in 2014 and states which can be unfriendly to democrats and white house secretary responding to today's news and saying the p
on a local level it now falls to the federal government to set them up. >> no money was budgeted for the federal government to do that. congress seems unwilling to give the administration money to do that. we are looking at a very messy situation. >> reporter: but the president says these exchanges will give americans and small business owners the choice to pick a health insurance plan that fits their budget. harris? >> harris: molly, thank you. american voters have been asking for years why hasn't the u.s. senate passed a well, after a dizzying marathon of votes and grueling all nighter by lawmaker we have it. senators on capitol hill have produced a budget. the $3.7 trillion plan passed by just one vote. 50-49. they worked through you the night voting time and time again on a slew of amendments to finally get a budget deal done around 5:00 this morning. the senate plan includes nearly a trillion dollars in new taxes over the next decade. and $100 billion in stimulus spending. and would do little to cut spending or the deficit. four democrats mark pryor of arkansas, kay haigen o
pay half your profits to the government. there is a bunch of other stuff the cpc wants including massive amount of new spending. many folks including me think this would absolutely destroy the american economy. with me is david callahan from a liberal think tank. let's take the rate for billionaires. and then they want 45% for millionaires, right? number one, i don't quite understand. i guess billionaires and millionaires would have to hand over their personal portfolio information to the irs? that would have to happen, right? >> the idea here, bill, is that donald trump and his dermatologists shouldn't be paying the same tax rate. right now, after 39 percent, everybody who makes more than $400,000 a year pays the same rate. so, it doesn't make sense that a dermatologist making $425,000 a year pays the same rate. >> bill: why doesn't that make sense? you always have a top rate on anything, okay? so you want a progressive rate up to infinity, i guess. that would require the federal government to go into my house and almost do a cool could you legs of what i'm worth to put a onerou
they discussed, but there are lots of things on the plate of the new pope who has to deal with governance within the vatican, its finances, all the challenges facing the church. it was a historic first. it's never been seen before that two popes both dressed in white, prayed together, ate together and spent quality time together. >> oh my goodness, so what maybe next for pope benedict? or not pope benedict, for pope francis. >> reporter: the pope emeritus, looking at the pictures, he looks quite frail. he said he wants to be hidden from the world. we understand that some time within the next month, he'll be moving to a converted monastery on the grounds of the vatican, but he's a studious man. he's not interested in having an active public life. he's made that quite clear. so our understanding is it will be sort of a life of contemplation, study and writing in the back gardens of the vatican. not a bad place to spend your retirement. >> not bad at all. ben wedeman, thanks so much from rome. >>> earlier today the u.s. senate passed its version of the federal budget. it's mostly symbolic since it
think he just might. that question was never posein the u.s. government or the cia, despite very smart people theyci have there. >> rose: then they launched thele invasion, and was immediately successful.an saddam went into hiding.dd what happened in the days after that, that made, for most of us looking at it, and for most analysts-- and you included -- serious mistakes?ys >> well, i was there for that part-- this enterprise as an embeddd correspondent, both in the command and on the ground.on and the expectation was-- theth americans essentially fought last war. they fought the 2003 war as if it was an extension of the 1991x war. they thought you defeat the republican guard pup go to-- you defeat kind of the conventionali forces. and then war is done, and we're finish people say there wasn't a plan. there was a plan. itas to hand over as quicklyan as possibleo t iraqis themselves to take out driver, put in some new drivers into the vehicle, and let it go down the road. >> rose: that was rumsfeld's theory. >> it was also condi rice's. the institution would hold, we put new people in a
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